How To Negotiate A Collective Bargaining Agreement

Many public lawmakers are considering restricting collective bargaining by public employees, including lawmakers in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Washington. The National Conference on National Legislation reports on more than 760 legislative measures put in place in 2011 on all aspects of collective bargaining. Question: How can companies preserve the right to collective bargaining? In their book What Workers Want (1999), Professors Richard Freeman and Joel Rogers found that more than 80 percent of employees wanted some form of collective interaction with management, with nearly half of them expressing an interest in traditional unions. On the other hand, most people who have expressed an interest in trade union organisation have expressed a desire for less confrontational relations between work and management. If union negotiators are not working to address companies` concerns, company negotiators only have to negotiate in a good faith impasse. At that time, they can legally pass their previous proposal, despite union opposition. They must be sure that they meet two essential conditions for such unilateral changes. First, they must be sure that they have reached an impasse in good faith. Secondly, after extensive negotiations, the parties have now reached irreconcilable positions. Stewards do not normally negotiate alone, but as part of a team with complementary skills. . .

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